JOIN OUR MAILING LIST.

We will keep you apprised on the latest news.

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST.

Stay in the loop.

GET TO KNOW US.

Ask us your questions.

  • Facebook
  • Instagram

Explore

11-15 Court Road, Bedford, New York, 10506    info@lagalleria.gallery    (914) 764 - 2223

© 2018 La Galleria 

TWO COLORS: A WHOLE WORLD

OMIROS

ABSTRACT

"TWO COLORS: A WHOLE WORLD"

1979

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS

 

In the ‘70s, Omiros began painting vast compositions of space, measuring nearly eighteen feet wide and more, in a similar style as the previous one, which is the centerpiece of the exhibition.

 

The large-scale horizontal work expands in all directions, with long, muscular brushstrokes in vibrant teal and blue, as rich red hues flow on its surface across the center, while shorter, impressionistic strokes in soft, muted white and flesh-toned pink rest beneath. Primarily horizontal in orientation, the lower half of the work is broken up by thin drip marks, abundantly emerging from the center of the canvas downward. The interplay of vertical and horizontal creates a dynamic composition that seemingly divides the canvas into three distinct planes of space by using short, blended strokes in the upper half, bold elongated marks at the center, and thin vertical marks in the lower register. 

 

Omiros’ limited color palette emphasizes the diversity in both tonal range and mark making present within the work, as it plays upon its title. Two Colors: A Whole World is at once insular in its description of what it is made from—"two colors"—and broad in its declaration of what it is, “a whole world.” In choosing red and blue—the colors so often associated with the iconography of the Virgin Mary and Christ as the primary colors for this piece—there is also a curious allusion to the artist’s subsequent Byzantine paintings begun in the same year. The exploration of space through abstraction approached by Omiros here is the conception of space as a transcendent entity, translated visually as an amalgamation of three-dimensional attributes that, ironically, exist on a flattened plane, a surface where space is both ambiguous and free.